Archive for the ‘Engine’ Category

Pilot Bearing

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

After cleaning the counterbore in the crank where the pilot bearing is retained, I noticed that the bearing was a sliding fit.  The bearing was easily installed and removed by hand.  I was concerned that the outer race may spin in the counterbore which is also known as creep.  Creep causes abrasive wear, shaft vibration, and excessive temperature rise.   I contacted Classic Chevy 5 Speed, the suppliers of the conversion kit, about the issue.  One of their service techs told me that the problem is not uncommon and a remedy is usually to use a center punch to make very small dimples around the wall of the counter bore in the crank in two rows.  I opted to use Loctite’s high temp bearing mount stick #39150 that I found on Summit Racing to secure the outer race.

Loctite

Quicktime Bellhousing

Sunday, November 15th, 2009

Today the QuickTime bellhousing was mounted to the block to check for runout.  The supplied backing plate was installed behind the flywheel.  The flywheel was then installed and bolts were torqued to 95 ft-lbs.  The bellhousing bolts were then torqued to 40 ft-lbs.  A dial indicator was placed on the flywheel (without the clutch in place) with a magnetic base to check runout.  Instructions call for a maximum of .005″ offset.  The crank was turned over until the highest reading on the dial was achieved.  The indicator was zeroed and the reading was taken again.  Highest reading was .031″.  The reading divided by two or .015″  is the total offset.  A set of Lakewood offset dowel pins were ordered to correct this.   The offset dowels were expensive but I beleive they’ll be well worth the money spent.  The offset portion rotates freely from the portion inside the block.  The dowel has two flats enabling the use of a wrench instead of a flat head screw driver.  When the proper location is acheived, a set screw locks everything in place.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Motor Pulleys

Saturday, October 31st, 2009

Today all of the motor pulleys and brackets were blasted and painted. Like usual, the first coat after blasting was self etching primer. A semi-gloss Sem’s black was sprayed over the primer. The power steering pulley was removed using a puller rented from Advance Auto. The pulley had seen better days and was bent in a few places. A second pulley was rounded up but it is roughly 0.5″ smaller in diameter. The smaller pulley is probably for non-AC cars but more research will tell.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Engine Complete

Saturday, October 10th, 2009

Last week I picked up my rebuilt engine from CLC Auto Machine & Parts in Lynchburg, VA. They were very good about taking the time to answer questions, give advice, and honor any special requests I had. I elected to paint the motor myself as I wanted to use some good epoxy primer and automotive paint. The engine was unloaded and any leftover oil residue was cleaned to guarantee good paint adhesion. The primer was PPG epoxy. The paint was a special mix of Omni. The color was matched from the high temp Pontiac blue metallic from an aresol can.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Motor Progress

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009

Today I stopped by CLC Auto Machine in Lynchburg VA to see the progress on my Pontiac 400. The majority of the machine work is already done. The cylinders were bored .030″ over and honed. Mains were aligned and valve seats cut for 2.11″/1.77″ valves instead of the stock 1.96″/1.66″ valves. Valves will be replaced with new stainless valves and the crank is to be balanced. I ordered a roller cam that I’ll drop off by the shop next week. The cam is Comp Cams roller XR276HR-10 ordered from Summit. Duration is 224/230 at 0.050″ and total lift is .502/.510. Combustion chambers in the head measure in at 75cc and piston to deck height will be 0.020″ to bring the compression to around 9.5:1. The motor should be ready to be picked up in about two weeks.